Modal verbs: may, might

Using ‘may’ and ‘might’ for possibility
He might go to the cinema this evening.
He may go to the cinema this evening.
Meaning: it’s possible that he will go.

He might not go to the cinema this evening.
He may not go to the cinema this evening.
Meaning: it’s possible that he will not go.

It might rain.
It may rain.
So, perhaps it will rain. 

It might not rain.
It may not rain.
So, perhaps it won’t rain. 

Usage: We use ‘might’ or ‘may’ when we want to say that something is possible and probably will do it and it will happen. May = Might, we use them in the same way.

For the past we use ‘may have done’ or ‘might have done’ 
He might have gone to the cinema last evening.
He may have gone to the cinema last evening.
Meaning: perhaps he went to the cinema.

He might not have gone to the cinema last evening.
He may not have gone to the cinema last evening.
Meaning: perhaps he didn’t go there. 

It might have rained.
It may have rained.
So, perhaps it rained. 

It might not have rained.
It may not have rained.
So, perhaps it didn’t rain.

Continuous form is ‘may be doing’ or ‘might be doing’.
Don’t phone at 9 pm. He might be watching football on TV.
Don’t phone at 9 pm. He may be watching football on TV.
Meaning: perhaps he will be watching it.

Phone at 9 pm. He might not be watching football.
Phone at 9 pm. He may not be watching football.
Meaning: perhaps he will not be watching at that moment.

Using ‘May’ for permission
May I ask a question? = Is it Ok to ask?
May I sit here? = Is it OK if I take this place?

Might as well
There is no busses or taxis here. But it’s a wonderful day today. We might as well walk home. We use ‘might as well’ when we suggest doing something, often when there is no better alternative. There is no reason not to do it.

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